Words that don’t exist in English

I’ve seen this list of 38 words that we could use in English a few times, and it always makes me wonder: why don’t we have words for these concepts in English? Pure coincidence, or has our culture traditionally not needed the words as much as other cultures have? How might we conceptualize these things, feelings, etc. differently if we had actual terms for them?

Shemomedjamo (Georgian): a meal that's so good you can't stop eating it; literally, "I accidentally ate the whole thing"

Shemomedjamo (Georgian): a meal that’s so good you can’t stop eating it; literally, “I accidentally ate the whole thing”

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2 comments

  1. This is why I love the German language. They simply add two or more simple words together to form a word representing complex ideas.
    Töpfereibetriebseröffnung (an example word taken from the German Wikipedia article on Zusammensetzung) is three different words that is the equivalent to the opening of a pottery firm or company. Complex idea represented in three basic words smooshed together.

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