My haiku’ed PhD

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Inspired by PhD by haiku, vol 1: OnCirculation

For more than 17 syllables on this topic, see this chapter: How Languages Construct Time by Lera Boroditsky.

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What is this thing we call time?

What is this thing we call time?
In English it sits on a line.
How do we know?
Our gestures, they show
Future in front, past behind.

But this is not true for everyone
For Mayans’, word time same as sun
Time revolves like a turn
From which we did learn
Studying time is even more fun!

Image from Walker, E. & Cooperrider, K. (2015). The continuity of metaphor: Evidence from temporal Gestures.
Image from Walker, E. & Cooperrider, K. (2015). The continuity of metaphor: Evidence from temporal Gestures.

 

Inspired by Le Guen, O. & Pool Balam, L.I. (2012). No metaphorical timeline in gesture and cognition among Yucatec Maya. Frontiers in Psychology, 3: 271. doi:  10.3389/fpsyg.2012.00271

My new brain bucket

When I was little, I rode my bike all the time. In the safety of my own, seemingly-large, U-shaped driveway, and in the quiet cul-de-sac by my house. My elementary school was on a long dead-end street with only two houses, and when I wanted to really live dangerously, I’d speed down its big hills (and then walk my bike up them). This was my prior experience with biking, but upon moving to a bike-friendly city in which I am carless, I got a new bike, strapped on my helmet, and with a mix of confidence and fear, took to the road. This haiku (from The Little Book of Neuroscience Haikus, my new favorite book) is in honor of my new wheels:

Helmet for my head

Protecting critical mass

Useful brain bucket.

(The book also notes that wearing a brain bucket can reduce the risk of head injury up to 85%, just FYI)